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Sin insurance. So I don’t have to worry about Hell or anything.
SIN INSURANCE BY MICHAEL P FERRARI 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 02
I leaned back into my seat, wondering how and when I was going to tell daddy the bad news.
THE RIDE BY TEDDY TOTIMEH 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 02

What’s the difference, I say. What would be an actual fortune?

FORTUNE BY AARON BURCH 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 02

These fortune cookies never have actual, real fortunes any more, she said.

What are you talking about?

On the weekends, we went out for Chinese. We tried to mix it up, find new places. We drove all over town, neighboring towns, like being on the run, or a scavenger hunt.

You know, she said. They are always predictions now. Weird sayings. Cliches. And they overload you with info—lucky numbers, how to say words in Chinese, the name of the restaurant.

What’s the difference, I say. What would be an actual fortune?

We always ordered lots of food, more than we could ever eat, took our time. Her husband worked late, long hours in a restaurant. We sampled, compared, prolonged the moment until the check and, the best part, the fortune cookies.

I don’t know, she said. I can’t think of an example. It just seems like they used to be different, like when we were kids or whatever.

I think I know what you mean, I said, thinking I might.

I swiped at my forehead. She smiled. I always ordered my food too spicy. She’d told me once that it was cute how the food made me sweat, cute how I dabbed my forehead with my napkin. A part of me wanted her to reach across the table, napkin my sweat away herself.

Why don’t you just order it less spicy, she’d asked a few times.

I held out my hand and she dropped in her fortune. What do you do with these, she said.

I just like to collect them, I guess, I said. I used to collect old Bazooka Joe comics. That kind of thing.

At home, I glue-sticked each one to my photo album. Reading them from beginning to end, I tried to make them make sense, make them into something coherent, a story. It would all come together, at some point, in due time.

 

34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 02

 

THE RIDE

TEDDY TOTIMEH

STOP LIGHT

RUTH KNIPE

55X2

ROSEMARY MOSCO

WARMING HOUSE

JEFF ESTERHOLM

TEACH ME HOW TO DANCE TO THE BLUES

ROBERT LOUIS BARTLETT

MEMORY CASH

KIM KOLARICH

ANYWAYS

DOROTHEE LANG

FOGCUTTER

FRANK HABERLE

GOING BACK TO YOU

MATTHEW WARD

CUPS OF COFFEE

LEE KERN

TELEPORTING THOUGHTS

JOHN ARTHUR PEGG

FORTUNES

AARON BURCH

WRONG WAY

MARTIN CHIPPERFIELD

CALL NOTES

TRACE SHERIDAN

THE MEMORY OF A SPIDER ON THE WALL

ROBERT K OMURA

OPIUM CLOUDS

ARASH FARZANEH

INTO THE MARGINS

JA TYLER

THE REALITY OF EROTICA

TOM GANT

THIS WALTZ

TIM KENNY

SIN INSURANCE

MICHAEL P FERRARI

ROUTINE

KEN RODGERS

THE NUMBER 15 BUS

NANCY GAUQUIER

RAPTORS AND RAGE

ASHLEY CALLENDER

LET NOT MY WING, DO NOT ASK

ROD STEWART

THE FLIGHT BACK

LESLIE JOSEPH

CHANT UNDONE

MITRA

SOME PEOPLE

JOSEPH GOOSEY

POP

MATTHEW ABUELO

INVULNERABLE HEARTS

SARAH TUTTLE

PF SLOAN AND THE MORNING OF RUE

COREY MESLER

A FEW MOMENTS OF REAL CLARITY

CRAIG WESLEY

KNOWLEDGE

CATHY DELALEU

REGRET IS A WOMAN’S FIELD

LAURA LEHEW

BLACK CROW

DAVE MORRISON

LAUNCH PAD: ROSEMARY MOSCO OF 55 WORDS 
INTERVIEWED BY TRACE SHERIDAN

A JOURNEY INTO WORDS: DOROTHEE LANG OF BLUEPRINTREVIEW INTERVIEWED BY TRACE SHERIDAN

SKIVE WRITING: MATTHEW WARD
INTERVIEWED BY MARTIN CHIPPERFIELD

LIT MAG THAT’S RESTAURANT QUALITY: AARON BURCH OF HOBART INTERVIEWED BY TRACE SHERIDAN

POP LIT: TRACE SHERIDAN AND MARTIN CHIPPERFIELD
INTERVIEWED BY SEAN MERRIGAN

MESLER’S MIX: COREY MESLER
INTERVIEWED BY MARTIN CHIPPERFIELD

MUD LUSCIOUS: JA TYLER INTERVIEWED
BY TRACE SHERIDAN

SUBTERRANEAN HANG-OUT: TIM KENNY
INTERVIEWED BY TRACE SHERIDAN

 

 

THE 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE BY MARTIN CHIPPERFIELD 34THPARALLEL@GMAIL.COM