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Take the simple, the gritty, and even the ugly, and write it into something beautiful.
HELEN CAREY 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 12
34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 12 AT THE STATION FAIG MAMED TEN LIES PAUL BUCHANAN AFTER HIS GREATEST LOVE ZDRAVKA EVTIMOVA SEE TO BELIEVE KIMBERLY SMEY OCEAN’S EDGE CHRISTINA OI YING NIP THE VIEW FROM HERE JACKIE DAVIS MARTIN PARENTHESIS MELISSA TANDIWE MYAMBO A CLEAR PATH SARAH MAY HÉNON LEAVING YAKIMA SOLLA CARROCK WHITE OAKS JULIE ZUCKERMAN IN THE FRAMEWORK
OF AN EMPTY HOUSE HELEN CAREY IN PASSING DAVID STALLINGS RIVER ROCKS PETER GORDON CREATE OR DIE: 
NATALIE D’AUVERGNE INTERVIEWS DONNA GRANDIN

Helen Carey

seeks to take the simple, the gritty, and even the ugly, and write it into something beautiful. She draws inspiration from artists and thinkers such as Hemingway, Krishnamurti, Charlie Chaplin, Bob Dylan, and her father, the painter John Carey. She is a senior sociology major at The College of New Jersey in Ewing, New Jersey, United States, where she writes essays for the alternative campus magazine, The Perspective. This is her first published poem.

Paul Buchanan

is the author of Snapshots, The Last Place I Want to Be, and several other books. His stories have been published in Storyquarterly, Cicada, Marlboro Review, and other journals. He teaches in the MFA program at Chapman University, Orange County, United States.

Solla Carrock

says writing, art, and people are most important to her. Carrock has an MFA in Art at Ohio State University, and for a couple of years she taught art to high school students in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She lives in Portland, Oregon, United States, and works as a computer programmer, but has also worked with homeless teenage girls and prison inmates in a drug treatment program. She has published poems in the Portland Review and To Topos magazines, and in an anthology Naming: Poems by Eight Women. She edited and contributed to another anthology, Mothers and Fathers: Being Parents, Remembering Parents.

Natalie D’Auvergne

is writing a collection of short stories set in her native St Lucia. She has a BA in English from Southern University and is studying for Masters Degrees in Literary Studies and Creative Writing at Chapman University, California, United States.

Donna Grandin

has an Honours BA in Art from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Her paintings are in private collections in the Caribbean, Canada, the United States, England, and Australia. She has had solo shows at Toronto City Hall, Henderson General Hospital in Hamilton, and at the Hamilton Central Library. Group exhibitions include McMaster Museum of Art, Hamilton Conservatory for the Arts, Burlington Art Centre, and St Lucia City Hall. Donna is represented by The Inner Gallery in St. Lucia. She received the Newcomer’s Award in the Visual Arts category at the M&C Arts Awards Competition in St Lucia in 1996, and the Gold Award in 2001. In 2009 she was commissioned by the city of Toronto to paint a mural at 400 McCowan, Scarborough, Ontario. Grandin (nee Gomez) was born on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia in 1974. Her ancestors settled in the Caribbean in the 1700s.

Zdravka Evtimova

was born in Bulgaria where she lives and works as literary translator. She has lived in Koeln, Germany and in Brussels, Belgium. Her short story collections published in English include Bitter Sky, SKREV Press, UK 2003, Somebody Else, MAG Press, US 2005, Miss Daniella, SKREV Press, UK 2007, Pale and Other Postmodern Bulgarian Stories, Vox Humana, Canada/Israel 2010, and a novel, God of Traitors, published by Book for a Buck Publishers, US 2007.

Peter Gordon

is a writer and media consultant. He was a television programming executive for HBO, PBS, and Golf Channel. He has been writing poetry for years, and his poetry has been published in the anthology Poetry to Feed the Spirit. He lives in Orlando, Florida, United States.

Sarah Henon

was born in southern France to French and American parents. She attended high school in Bangkok and undergraduate studies at the University of Sydney, Australia. She worked for a non-government organization in Cambodia, particularly in disability. “I never expected to write fiction until this story started pouring out of me, on a day when Cambodian newspapers announced yet another death from a land mine,” Sarah says. “My aim is to raise awareness of land mines and UXOs, while exploring issues of culture, gender, and guilt.” sarah.henon@gmail.com

Faig Mamed

is a writer, screenwriter, and translator. He studied at Maxim Gorky Literature Institute (Russia), State University of Languages (Azerbaijan), Gotham Writers’ Workshop (US), and Winghill Writing School (Canada). bonazaz(@gmail.com

Jackie Davis Martin

divides her life (so far) into thirds: childhood in Pennsylvania, parenthood in New Jersey, maturation, of sorts, in California, United States. She says her vocation of teaching literature has consistently blurred into the avocation of reading and writing. She has had stories published in a number of literary journals, including Trillium, Midway, Sangam, Fastforward, Flashquake, apparatus, and millionstories, as well as essays in Language and Culture, The Teacher’s Voice, and in JAAM, a journal of arts. “It seems all I do is read and write (and go to plays and operas and ballets), but when anyone asks what I’m reading, I’m stuck,” she says.

Melissa Tandiwe Myambo

is the author of Jacaranda Journals (Macmillan South Africa, 2004), a collection of short stories set in Zimbabwe. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, United States, during the summer and in winter she says she follows the sun to warmer climes.

Christina Oi Ying Nip

was born in Hong Kong and raised in Singapore. She moved to San Francisco, United States, with her family four years ago. She says she is drawn to quirky and funny everyday things. “There is nothing I love more than writing, with the exception (perhaps) of watching Monty Python’s Flying Circus with a hot cup of tea on a rainy day,” she says.

Lindsey Silken

says that several years of editing JVibe, a teen magazine, has infected her fiction with themes of youth and love. She lives and works in Baltimore, United States, (a forever Bostonian) but her favorite city is San Francisco. Lindsey recently graduated from the Bennington Writing Seminars. “My life is about doing as much as I can, while I can,” she says.

Kimberly Smey

lives in Binghamton, New York, United States. She’s a recent college graduate and intends to return to school for an MA in English and achieve her lifelong goal of becoming Van Wilder. She says her stories are often inspired by people-watching, one of her favorite pastimes, because real people make inspiring stories. ksmey1@yahoo.com

David Stallings

was born in the United States South and raised in Alaska and Colorado before moving to the Pacific Northwest 36 years ago. His work has been published in Northwest literary journals. He is active in local poetry circles and, among other writing projects, is completing a series of responses to 100 of Han-shan’s Cold Mountain poems. Once a university professor of urban geography he spent many years working to develop public transportation in the Puget Sound region. stallings.david@gmail.com

Julie Zuckerman

was born and raised in Connecticut, and moved to Israel 14 years ago. She says writing has always been part of her working life. After starting in journalism, she moved on to consulting and business writing for high-tech companies. “I am thrilled now to have discovered that I may have a creative side after all,” Zuckerman says. Her stories have been published in The New Orphic Review and Descant. She hopes to publish a novel eventually. When not at work on her writing, she can be found swimming, biking, running, or chasing after her four children.

It is not only form or style that makes me write, but the discovery process of the inner self.
JOANNA JEANINE SCHMIDT 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 44
My mother and I have this special connection.
MARI CASEY 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 43
I tried to fix my head, hang out with people, stop writing for a bit.
POLINA SIMAKOVA AKA AGRIPPINA DOMANSKI 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 42
I am a writer because writing keeps me sane.
NATASHA NOAH 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 41
I write to stay alive, to feel human.
MILENA PETROVIC 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 40
As is frequently the case, I began this story with a vague concept: in this case a story about sex.
LIZ FYNE 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 39
Thoughts of gender, identity, and expectations. And Adrienne Rich poetry.
REBECCA DIMYAN 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 38
The poems are about the competition, jealousy, frustration, friendship, loss, and joy that all bands experience.
JOE DE PATTA 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 37
When it all falls away we find ourselves still alive, and so we continue.
JOSHUA DULL 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 35
I’m an artist because it allows me to be free.
SHANNON MARIE KELLY 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 27
Words are the only tools that I even remotely know how to use.
MOURA MCGOVERN 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 25
Most of my poetry deals with gang violence and the impact it has on someone's life.
KANISHKA LAMPKIN 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 14
I write because I’m good at it. Sure, I dress up good too.
ETKIN CAMOGLU 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 30
I want to discover, to explore what I don’t know yet.
TANIA VERHELST 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 32
When music beat me up and threw me out of the car I began to write.
DAVE MORRISON 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
I like a poem that blows itself wide open at the end.
SUSAN WHITMORE 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE ISSUE 31
 THE 34THPARALLEL MAGAZINE BY MARTIN CHIPPERFIELD 34THPARALLEL@GMAIL.COM